Thursday, August 16, 2018

Are you one of those counted?



From Social Media Today

National Relaxation Day

Did you know that? Or, who establishes these days? Some company called Mental Floss has declared it. They have even given us "15 Scientific Ways to Relax for National Relaxation Day".

Here are their "ways"
1. GET A HOUSE OR OFFICE PLANT.
2. AVOID SCREENS BEFORE BEDTIME.
3. LISTEN TO CLASSICAL MUSIC.
4. DRINK GREEN TEA SWEETENED WITH HONEY.
5. GIVE YOURSELF A HAND MASSAGE.
6. LOCK LIPS WITH SOMEONE.
7. CHEW GUM.
8. BLOW UP A BALLOON.
9. MOW THE LAWN.
10. FIND SOMETHING TO MAKE YOU LAUGH.
11. MUNCH ON CHOCOLATE.
12. EAT A BANANA.
13. MAKE ANOTHER TRIP TO THE FRUIT STAND.
14. FOCUS ON RELAXING ALL OF YOUR MUSCLES.
15. TAKE A MINI MENTAL VACATION.

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

A super athlete at 84



Courtesy of our Florida correspondent

Dogs and wounds

Be a college application consultant

Your background need not be education. You can be a former CIA agent, a Hollywood screenwriter, a radiologist. There are more than 2,000 people doing the job. And making a decent dollar. Ms Bayliss runs the four-day Application Boot Camp at a Boston-area hotel. It's only $16,000.

Or, you can charge $5,000 or more if you are a summer expert who helps a teenager “find his passion” and “architect a plan” that includes brand-building volunteer, educational, or work opportunities. 

In the Boston area, the average consulting package — which includes a college list, essay and interview prep, and organizational tools and general advice — costs about $4,800. But it’s possible to spend $80,000 or more for star consultants.

Monday, August 13, 2018

The Mass. State Police has a few problems

The Boston Globe has been looking at the State Troopers and has found out a few things
Forty-six  troopers are involved in a pay scandal.
Two troopers routinely filed for more than 30 hours a week in overtime and paid details, but, according to the investigators, didn’t work the entire shifts, and sometimes no part of them at all. 
Leaders were repeatedly confronted not only with remarkable amounts of overtime hours but also suspicious sick time claims and sloppy record keeping across the agency.
Scores of troopers continued to routinely rake in more than $100,000 a year just in overtime and paid details.
Audits and disciplinary letters reviewed by the Globe show that at least 67 troopers were suspected of abusing sick leave since 2011, though they received little, if any, punishment beyond an infrequent written warning. One trooper regularly worked a paid detail, then clocked in for his regular shift, then filed for a partial sick day.
State Police audits show that payroll records in about 40 percent of the barracks contained inaccurate or unclear entries or were missing key information, such as when and where troopers worked.retired amid a scandal involving troopers who say they were ordered to falsify a police report to protect a judge’s daughter.
A trooper is charged with embezzlement; he altered traffic citations to make it look like he issued tickets during phony overtime shifts.
The pay of two troopers; one earned $187,340 last year, including about $72,000 in overtime and additional pay. The other earned roughly $181,661, including about $82,000 in overtime and other pay.
The agency’s former head of payroll pleaded guilty in June to stealing $23,900 from the department.
Inspectors found that one Troop F member coupled so many sick days with other time off that he worked just four Fridays during 2014.
A separate 2016 inspection of Troop F uncovered 11 senior officers who failed to clearly document what work they did during significant chunks of overtime.

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Helping him walk

Minimizing risk in the Emergency Room

See a woman doctor.

At times it seems that there are more studies than people. While the authors usually believe strongly that their studies are error-free and reflect the real world, that is not always the case, as we are all human beings. Nonetheless, studies are interesting.

One new study I looked at recently does not have a definitive conclusion. It only suggests that female heart attack patients may be at a higher risk of mortality in the emergency room if they see a male physician rather than a female one. Women are significantly less likely to survive heart attacks. According to 2016 American Heart Association statement, 26 percent of women will die within a year of a heart attack compared with just 19 percent of men. The gap widens with time: By five years after a heart attack almost half of women die, compared with 36 percent of men.

The study I looked at was done in Florida. The researchers  reviewed every heart attack case from every ER in the state. They found that if a heart attack patient was a woman and her emergency physician a man, her risk of death rises by about 12 percent. This means approximately one out of every 66 women with heart attacks dies in the emergency room if she sees a male doctor rather than a female one.

Interestingly, the study found that everyone was more likely to survive if they saw a female physician, and a study published last year in JAMA Internal Medicine indicated all patients of female physicians had lower mortality and hospital readmission rates.